What are the Benefits of Parenting Coaching?

The goal of parenting coaches are to help adults deal with intense children. There are different kinds of approaches, however, it is important to concentrate on the present moment in comparison to future outcomes about the communication with children. Besides helping your child, when going through this experience everyone has the opportunity to benefit.

Tony Karls, host of Flourishing Families, sits down with Tina Feigal of Parenting Mojo[1] and Anu Family Services.[2] Tina is also the writer of Present Moment Parenting: The Guide To A Peaceful Life With Your Intense Child.[3] They discuss how everyone benefits from parenting coaching. Everyone benefits when you can bring an “Intense Child” back to equilibrium.

What are the Benefits of Parenting Coaching?

Tina Feigal of Parenting Mojo[1] drew on her own experience raising a child that experienced more fear than most when developing her approach to parenting coaching. She combined that personal experience with her master's degree in school psychology. Tina's approach to parenting focuses on the “present moment” versus the future probabilities and the physiological effects of communication on children.

Tina Feigal says on her approach: “I help adults deal with intense children so they can act from their values of compassion and kindness, without giving in to unreasonable requests. I offer an approach that deeply honors the child while holding firm limits, giving both adults and children a secure framework in which to thrive.”

Who Benefits From Parenting Coaching?

Tony Karls asks Tina, “Who benefits from parenting coaching?” Everyone benefits. The coaches benefit. The parents and the children benefit. The grandparents, aunts and uncles, and teachers also benefit. Everyone who is around the child that you don't want to come over to your house, because their behavior is going to cause a problem. Cause a ruckus. “Everyone benefits when you can bring an Intense Child back to equilibrium,” Tina says.

Tina sits with the parents. Her approach leaves the child out of the sessions. “We don't want one more meeting where the child identifies that they are the problem,” Tina explains. Tina teaches the parents how their communication affects the child's body and, therefore, their behavior. “What is the body doing when the parent talks to the child?”

Tina writes in her blog that talking to a child can have a variety of results.[4] Your child may:

  1. Listen and want to talk.
  2. They seem to listen, but move on without response.
  3. Act as though they are not listening, but they are listening.
  4. Hear your tone and feel it is unforgiving and turn away.
  5. Be too preoccupied to listen.

Tina goes on to say, “You must first build trust.” “Listen deeply, reflect what your child has said, and don't pass judgment.” Tina defines trust with your child as seeing them and accepting their “state of mind in the present moment.”

Present Parenting Coaching focuses on the power of communication and is focused on the “now.” Tina makes it clear that, if we see behavior, we don't want to repeat, worrying about the future will not work. “Staying in the present with your child does the trick,” Tina concludes.

Learn more about Tina Feigal on the Parenting Mojo website:

Parenting Mojo
https://www.parentingmojo.com/
651-453-0123

We work with people from everywhere.
Or email: tina@parentingmojo.com

At Sterling, we believe the final foundational piece to a strong family is time together. When we speak of time, this is not just time around each other, but more importantly, time free from external distractions. We believe spending time together engaging in conversation in settings such as family dinners at home, playing old fashioned board/card games or settings such as “around the campfire” digitally free and disconnected from the outside world are critical to building a solid foundation.

Flourishing Families is a Sterling Series aimed at highlighting organizations in our community that support and build up strong families.

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